A Sustainable Future: Why Biodiversity Is a Financial Risk (Man Group)

Elizabeth Mrema, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), discusses COP-15 and the new biodiversity framework.

It is well established that climate change poses significant risks to businesses and future investments but these concerns are often intricately connected to biodiversity and nature-related issues. Elizabeth Mrema, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, and co-chair of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures joins the podcast to discuss how firms can report and act on evolving nature-related risks.

Promotion

In this far-reaching conversation, Elizabeth Mrema and Jason Mitchell, co-Head of Responsible Investment at Man Group, talk about the upcoming UN Biodiversity Conference COP-15, the legacy of the 2010 governmental Aichi Biodiversity Targets and what the new expectations may be for a post-pandemic global biodiversity framework.

Elizabeth Maruma Mrema is United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a multilateral treaty addressing the loss of biodiversity and climate change, and co-chair of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD).

Elizabeth has two decades of experience working in the development and environment sectors. She is biodiversity leader and lawyer, from Tanzania, with a track record of negotiating next-generation policies and enabling instruments for planet, people, and prosperity. Elizabeth’s work as Deputy Director of the Ecosystems Division at the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) focused on the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws both at the national, regional, and international level.

Her previous work includes being the Executive Secretary of the UNEP/Secretariat of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) in which she oversaw the conservation of migratory animals globally.

 

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